superbug may have spread outside hospitals

Six people in Colorado recently became infected with a “nightmare” superbug that until now, has mostly been limited to people in hospitals, according to a new report. The new cases suggest the superbug may have spread outside of health care facilities.

The superbug is known as carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE , a family of bacteria that are difficult to treat because they are resistant to powerful antibiotics. So far, nearly all cases of CRE infections have been seen in people who stay health care facilities, or who have been treated with certain medical procedures or devices, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

But the six people in the new report had not stayed in a health care facility for at least a year before they contracted the infection. They had not recently undergone surgery or dialysis, either, and hadn’t received any invasive devices, such as having a catheter or feeding tube inserted — all of which can be risk factors for CRE infections, the report said.

Thus, the six cases appear to be “community-associated” CRE infections , meaning the patients may have picked up these bacteria from somewhere in their everyday lives, outside of a health care setting.

CRE infections

Somthing you need to know about gloves

At your next doctor’s exam, one thing will be certain: Your physician won’t be using powdered medical gloves.

That’s because the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) just issued a ban on powdered medical gloves , calling them dangerous. The ruling marks only the second time in history that the FDA has banned a medical device.

The agency first proposed the ban back in March, and issued a final ruling today (Dec. 16). The ban will take effect on Jan. 19, 2017.

“While medical gloves play a significant role in protecting patients, health care providers and other individuals in close proximity, powdered gloves are very dangerous for a variety of reasons,” the FDA said in a statement. [ 9 Disgusting Things That the FDA Allows in Your Food

The powder is sometimes added to gloves to make them easier to take on and off, the agency said. But if the powder on latex gloves becomes airborne, it can cause allergic reactions . What’s more, use of the gloves on patients has been associated with wound inflammation, as well as a condition in which bands of scar tissue form between people’s organs after surgery, the FDA said.

Today’s state-of-the-art medical gloves include nonpowdered alternatives that provide all